Muscle Recovery


The Medical Massage Jets™ and hot water of a Medical Spa™ is soothing and relaxing after a strenuous workout. It is the best therapy you can receive for your health following the cool down stage after a workout. The convenience of a Medical Spa™ makes it easy to get the therapy you need to relieve sore muscles in your body.

The combination of heat, buoyancy, and massage jets in a Medical Spa™ is designed to deliver highly effective hydrotherapy benefits. This is especially important because like most people, a workout or active chores can leave your body in a recovering state for 2 and sometimes 3 days later.* Imagine being able to have a quick, effective turn-around on your recovery from strenuous activities with a Medical Spa™.

Between the NBA, NHL, MLB and NFL, every franchise organization makes sure that their athletes have hydrotherapy available to recover from games or practices. Hydrotherapy is used to “treat injuries and aid in the rehabilitation of the athlete,” according to the book, Principles of Manual Sports Medicine. While this has benefits just by itself, pairing a soak in a Medical Spa™ with stretching can even further your flexibility and build up your tolerance to sore and aching muscles.*

Medical Spas™ are more than just spas. They were designed to help heal your body. Because of all the doctors that came together to help make Medical Spas™ possible, and the over 100+ years of combined experience they all provided, there are lots of medical benefits you will receive by using it daily.

Because Medical Spas™ are based purely on documented studies; we have included the appropriate studies below with links for further research and verification.

Reference:

* Myers, Jonathan. "Exercise and Cardiovascular Health." Circulation. American Heart Association, Inc., 07 Jan. 2003. Web.

* Ingraham, Paul. "Hot Baths for Pain." Pain Science. Pain Science, n.d. Web

* Jefferys, Ian, MS. "A Multidimensional Approach to Enhancing Recovery.: Strength & Conditioning Journal." Journal LWW. National Strength and Conditioning Association, n.d. Web.


Lower body Strength, Movement and Flexibility - American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

Clinical Study

Research:

To investigate the effectiveness of aquatic exercise in improving lower limb strength in stroke patients. Knee, hip, and ankle strength were studied as well as movement, and flexibility.

Results:

Compared with the conventional intervention, the aquatic intervention resulted in significantly higher knee extension and ankle plantar flexion torque, accompanied with a significantly lower knee extension co contraction ratio in the paretic limb. Aquatic exercise enhanced muscle strength in paretic lower limbs and improved muscle co contraction without increasing spasticity in sub acute stroke patients. .

Link to Study

Zhang, Yue, Yi-Zhao Wang, Li-Ping Huang, Bei Bai, Shi Zhou, Miao-Miao Yin, Hua Zhao, Xiao-Na Zhou, and Hong-Tu Wang. "Aquatic Therapy Improves Outcomes for Subacute Stroke Patients by Enhancing Muscular Strength of Paretic Lower Limbs Without Increasing Spasticity." American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation 95.11 (2016)


Muscle Regeneration – National Center for Biotechnology Information

Clinical Study

Research:

Hyperthermia therapy has recently emerged as a clinical modality used to finely tune heat stress inside the human body for various biomedical applications. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the optimal timing or temperature of heat stress that is needed to achieve favorable results following hyperthermia therapy for muscle regeneration purposes. The regeneration of skeletal muscle after injury is a highly complex and coordinated process that involves a multitude of cellular mechanisms. The main objective of this study was to characterize the effects of hyperthermal therapy on the overall behavior of myoblasts during myogenic differentiation.

Results:

Atrophy genes were sensitive even to moderate hyperthermia, indicating that strictly controlled heat stress is required to minimize the development of atrophy in myotubes. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis was enhanced following thermal induction of myoblasts, suggesting a subsequent shift toward anabolic demand requirements for energy production. This study offers a new perspective to understand and utilize the time and temperature-sensitive effects of hyperthermal therapy on muscle regeneration.

Link to Study

"Controlled Heat Stress Promotes Myofibrillogenesis during Myogenesis." National Center for Biotechnology Information. U.S. National Library of Medicine, n.d. 8 Nov. 2016.