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Documented Research



The Medical Spas are based purely on documented studies. While many of our competitors make claims without proof, we only provide benefits that are based on documented studies, so you can really see how big of an impact our Medical SpasTM can be for your health.

All studies below citations or actual links to the research so you can freely verify the information.

We are extremely careful which products we put our name on. Because we want to make sure every product we put our name on works for you, we only select products with overwhelming documented research behind them. Our brand is extremely important to us.


Migraine Headaches - Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice

Clinical Study

Research:

Migraine is associated with autonomic symptoms. The growing body of literature suggests that the dysfunctional autonomic nervous system might play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of migraine. Thermal therapies have been hypothesized to modulate these changes and alleviate pain. However, data regarding the efficacy of hydrotherapy in migraine remain scant. We evaluated the effect of add on hydrotherapy procedure in migraine patients.

Results:

There was a significant decrease in headache impact score, frequency, and intensity of headaches following treatment and most evident in the hydrotherapy group. Our study shows that hydrotherapy enhanced the vagal tone in addition to reducing the frequency and intensity of headaches in migraine patients.

Link to Study

Sathyaprabha, Tn, Mu Sujan, Mraghavendra Rao, Ravikiran Kisan, Hulegara Abhishekh, Atchayaram Nalini, and Trichurr Raju. "Influence of Hydrotherapy on Clinical and Cardiac Autonomic Function in Migraine Patients." Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice J Neurosci Rural Pract 7.1 (2016)



Relaxation – Department of Anesthesiology and Applied Physiology

Clinical Study

Research:

Can heat, as a common tool be used in the treatment of muscular disorders such as stiffness or myalgia. Clinical data as well as in vitro experiments demonstrate that increased temperatures lead to a head-related myofacial relaxation. Investigating the differential effects of the skeletal muscle fibers and the facial structures.

Results:

The increased temperature leads to an enhancement in the functional properties of skeletal muscle in terms of accelerated contraction and relaxation parameters. There is a direct fascial relaxation that contributes to heat-induced relaxation. This supports the notion that the regulation of fascial stiffness plays a major part in resting muscle tone.

Link to Study

"The Role of Fascia in Resting Muscle Tone and Heat Induced Relaxation." Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Department of Anesthesiology and Applied Physiology 12.4 (2008)


Microvascular Function – The Physiological Society

Clinical Study

Research:

Heat therapy increased flow-mediated dilatation, reduced arterial stiffness, reduced mean arterial and diastolic blood pressure, and reduced carotid intimae media thickness, with changes all on par or greater than what is typically observed in sedentary subjects with exercise training.

Results:

Results show for the first time that heat therapy has widespread and robust effects on vascular function, and as such, could be a viable treatment option for improving cardiovascular health in a variety of patient populations, particularly those with limited exercise tolerance and/or capabilities.

Link to Study

Brunt, Vienna E., Matthew J. Howard, Michael A. Francisco, Brett R. Ely, and Christopher T. Minson. "Passive Heat Therapy Improves Endothelial Function, Arterial Stiffness and Blood Pressure in Sedentary Humans." The Journal of Physiology 594.18 (2016)


Fatigue and Sleep Disturbance – Sleep Medicine

Clinical Study

Research:

To compare hydrotherapy (HT) and conventional physiotherapy (CP) in the treatment of fibromyalgia (FM), regarding quality of life (QOL), total sleep time (TST), and total nap time (TNT).

Results:

All hydrotherapy patients increased 1 hour in total sleep time compared to CP patients. TNT decreased in the HT group. HT is more effective than CP to improve TST and to decrease TNT in FM patients.

Link to Study

Vitorino, Debora Fernandes De Melo, Luciane Bizari Coin De Carvalho, and Gilmar Fernandes Do Prado. "Hydrotherapy and Conventional Physiotherapy Improve Total Sleep Time and Quality of Life of Fibromyalgia Patients: Randomized Clinical Trial." Sleep Medicine 7.3 (2006)


Preventing Illness - Journal of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research

Clinical Study

Research:

Water therapy involves the modulation of body temperature like delivery of hot and cold to the body. It encompasses submerging of all or part of the body in water. The study covers an expansive variety of therapeutic techniques and approaches which grasp benefits of water's physical properties for therapeutic purposes, namely stimulation of blood circulation and symptomatic treatment of certain diseases.

Results:

The advantages of hydrotherapy comprise of detoxification (helps in elimination of waste), loosening tense muscles and assisting relaxation, enhancing metabolic rate and digestion activity, cell hydrating, and improving skin and muscle tone. In addition, it also boosts the immune system by its efficient functioning and also improves internal organs functioning by stimulating blood supply. Conclusively, it can be elucidated that in future hydrotherapy will become a major tool for stress relieving consequently, improving body function and preventing illness.

Link to Study

Nagaich, Upendra. "Hydrotherapy: Tool for Preventing Illness." J Adv Pharm Technol Res Journal of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research 7.3 (2016)


Lower body Strength, Movement and Flexibility - American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

Clinical Study

Research:

To investigate the effectiveness of aquatic exercise in improving lower limb strength in stroke patients. Knee, hip, and ankle strength were studied as well as movement, and flexibility.

Results:

Compared with the conventional intervention, the aquatic intervention resulted in significantly higher knee extension and ankle plantar flexion torque, accompanied with a significantly lower knee extension co contraction ratio in the paretic limb. Aquatic exercise enhanced muscle strength in paretic lower limbs and improved muscle co contraction without increasing spasticity in sub acute stroke patients. .

Link to Study

Zhang, Yue, Yi-Zhao Wang, Li-Ping Huang, Bei Bai, Shi Zhou, Miao-Miao Yin, Hua Zhao, Xiao-Na Zhou, and Hong-Tu Wang. "Aquatic Therapy Improves Outcomes for Subacute Stroke Patients by Enhancing Muscular Strength of Paretic Lower Limbs Without Increasing Spasticity." American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation 95.11 (2016)


Senior Health - Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy

Clinical Study

Research:

Balance training in the aquatic environment is often used in rehabilitation practice to improve static and dynamic balance. Although aquatic therapy is widely used in clinical practice, we still lack evidence on how immersion in water actually impacts postural control. Older adults with balance deficits often fear falling and limit their mobility. Poor balance is multi-factorial, influenced by medication interactions, musculoskeletal and sensory system changes, and poor neuromuscular response to changes in body positions. Aquatic physical therapy is an intervention used to improve balance and decrease falls.

Results:

The Physical balance measures, Berg Balance Scale and Timed Up and Go, showed significant improvement after aquatic therapy. The increased postural instability and the change in postural control strategies that the aquatic environment offers may be a beneficial stimulus for improving balance control. Physical outcome measures improved with Aquatic therapy.

Link to Study

Covill, Laura G., Cynthia Utley, and Cheryl Hochstein. "Comparison of Ai Chi and Impairment-Based Aquatic Therapy for Older Adults With Balance Problems." Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy (2016)

Body Mass Loss – The Scientific World Journal

Clinical Study

Research:

The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and body mass loss (BML) induced by thermal stress in a dry sauna.

Results:

The smallest BML was noted in underweight subjects; students with normal weight lost more weight, whereas the greatest BML was reported in overweight and obese subjects. Persons with a high BMI are at higher risk of dehydration. The proposed equations for calculating BML based on a person's BMI can be useful in estimating the amount of fluids that should be replenished by both men and women during a visit to a dry sauna.

Link to Study

Podstawski, Robert, Tomasz Boraczyński, Michał Boraczyński, Dariusz Choszcz, Stefan Mańkowski, and Piotr Markowski. "Sauna-Induced Body Mass Loss in Young Sedentary Women and Men." The Scientific World Journal 2014 (2014)


Muscle Regeneration – National Center for Biotechnology Information

Clinical Study

Research:

Hyperthermia therapy has recently emerged as a clinical modality used to finely tune heat stress inside the human body for various biomedical applications. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the optimal timing or temperature of heat stress that is needed to achieve favorable results following hyperthermia therapy for muscle regeneration purposes. The regeneration of skeletal muscle after injury is a highly complex and coordinated process that involves a multitude of cellular mechanisms. The main objective of this study was to characterize the effects of hyperthermal therapy on the overall behavior of myoblasts during myogenic differentiation.

Results:

Atrophy genes were sensitive even to moderate hyperthermia, indicating that strictly controlled heat stress is required to minimize the development of atrophy in myotubes. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis was enhanced following thermal induction of myoblasts, suggesting a subsequent shift toward anabolic demand requirements for energy production. This study offers a new perspective to understand and utilize the time and temperature-sensitive effects of hyperthermal therapy on muscle regeneration.

Link to Study

"Controlled Heat Stress Promotes Myofibrillogenesis during Myogenesis." National Center for Biotechnology Information. U.S. National Library of Medicine, n.d. 8 Nov. 2016.


Relaxation – Department of Anesthesiology and Applied Physiology

Clinical Study

Research:

Can heat, as a common tool be used in the treatment of muscular disorders such as stiffness or myalgia. Clinical data as well as in vitro experiments demonstrate that increased temperatures lead to a head-related myofacial relaxation. Investigating the differential effects of the skeletal muscle fibers and the facial structures.

Results:

The increased temperature leads to an enhancement in the functional properties of skeletal muscle in terms of accelerated contraction and relaxation parameters. There is a direct fascial relaxation that contributes to heat-induced relaxation. This supports the notion that the regulation of fascial stiffness plays a major part in resting muscle tone.

Link to Study

"The Role of Fascia in Resting Muscle Tone and Heat Induced Relaxation." Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Department of Anesthesiology and Applied Physiology 12.4 (2008)